Registration open for El’Manuscript 2016 Conference and Workshops

Vilnius, Lithuania
22-28 August 2016
URL: http://textualheritage.org/en/conf.html

Call for papers (closed): https://digitalmedievalist.wordpress.com/2015/11/23/elmanuscript-2016-conference-vilnius-lithuania/

Even if you did not submit a proposal to present at this conference in August, there are still other ways to participate!

There is a list of papers accepted to the conference linked from the word “Reports” at http://textualheritage.org/content/view/664/288/lang,english/ . If you would like to attend the conference without presenting, please fill out the form linked from that page. (Those who are presenting have already submitted information for registration.)

You’ll see that the form also includes a list of possible workshops to be held in Vilnius in conjunction with the conference. If you are interested in attending workshops — even if you have already submitted information as a speaker during the conference — please fill out the form to help gauge interest in the various possible topics.

CfP: Fifth AIUCD Annual Conference

Digital editions: representation, interoperability, text analysis and infrastructures

Fifth Annual Conference of the AIUCD (Italian Association of Digital Humanities)

CALL FOR PAPERS AND POSTERS

Date: 7-9 September 2016
Location: Aula Magna S. Trentin, Ca’ Dolfin, Dorsoduro 3825/e – 30123 Venezia
URL: http://www.himeros.eu/aiucd2016/

The AIUCD 2016 conference is devoted to the representation and study of text under different points of view (resources, analysis, infrastructures) in order to bring together philologists, historians, digital humanists, computational linguists, logicians, computer scientists and software engineers and discuss about text.
On the one hand, the Digital Humanities, in addition to the creation and maintenance of resources (digitization, annotation, etc.), must take into account how these will be used. On the other, Computational Linguistics, in addition to the development of computational tools (parsers, named entity extractors, etc.), must take into account the quality of the resources on which the same tools are applied.
These aspects, i.e. formal (models), digital (resources), computational (tools), infrastructural (platforms) and social (communities) involve different skills that the conference aims to make interact with each other.
The creation of resources and the development of tools should advance hand in hand, and should be based on solid models that meet the requirements established by the experts of the field. It is necessary that resources and tools be developed in parallel: only if you know how to use the text, what can be extracted from it and how to do it, can you adequately represent it.
Now that the major digitization initiatives provide multiple editions of the same works, abundant secondary literature, as well as numerous reference books (dictionaries, encyclopedias, etc.), the philologist who works in the digital age should be able to seamlessly switch from handling purely philological phenomena (variant studies) to text analysis performed according to different methods (computational linguistics). The analysis tools and statistical methods developed to be used on an entire corpus of literary texts or extensive secondary literature collections must be integrated with the tools for comparing textual variants and evaluating possible interpretations.
It is time for research infrastructures to be able to guarantee interoperability and integration between the instruments for philological studies and the instruments for the analysis of large textual corpora, breaking down the rigid barriers between digital and computational philology on the one hand, and corpus linguistics on the other.

For more information about topics and submissions, and for an Italian version of the Call for Papers please visit: http://www.himeros.eu/aiucd2016/

Call for Papers: Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought, slated for April 7-9, 2016

Call for Papers
Sam Houston State University’s
Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought
April 7-9, 2016

Featuring Plenary Speaker: Dr. Caroline Bruzelius, Professor of Art History, Duke University

The conference is slated to be held on the beautiful campus of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.

Deadline to propose a Special Session:      Aug. 15, 2015
Deadline for abstracts:                                Nov. 15, 2015
Notification of acceptance:                        Dec. 15, 2015

You are invited to send your 250-300-word abstract to Dr. Darci Hill, Conference Director, on any topic dealing with Medieval and/or Renaissance thought. If you would like to propose a special session, you are welcome to do that as well. We welcome papers and performances on any aspect of this time period. Papers dealing with language and linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, history, art, music, and theatre are all equally welcome.

Please send all inquiries and abstracts electronically to:

Dr. Darci Hill,
Conference Director,
Dr.darci.hill@gmail.com
Department of English
Sam Houston State University
Huntsville, Texas 77340

Third Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Call for Papers – Third Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

June 15–17, 2015
Saint Louis University
Saint Louis, Missouri

The Third Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies (June 15-17, 2015) is a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the Symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation into all topics and in all disciplines of medieval and early modern studies.

The Symposium is held annually on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University. On campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned apartments as well as a luxurious boutique hotel. Inexpensive meal plans are also available, although there is a wealth of restaurants, bars, and cultural venues within easy walking distance of campus.

The plenary speakers for this year will be Kenneth Pennington, of Catholic University of America, and Ingrid Rowland, of the University of Notre Dame.

While attending the Symposium participants are free to use the Vatican Film Library, the Rare Book and Manuscripts Collection, and the general collection at Saint Louis University’s Pius XII Memorial Library.

The Third Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies invites proposals for papers, complete sessions, and roundtables. Any topics regarding the scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern world are welcome. Papers are normally twenty minutes each and sessions are scheduled for ninety minutes. Scholarly organizations are especially encouraged to sponsor proposals for complete sessions.

The deadline for all submissions is December 31. Decisions will be made in January and the final program will be published in February.

For more information or to submit your proposal online go to: http://smrs.slu.edu


The John Doran Prize – $500

Dr. John Doran (1966-2012) was senior lecturer in Medieval History at the University of Chester, UK, and an expert in the history of the papacy and the city of Rome. In honor of his commitment to scholarly excellence, the annual John Doran Prize recognizes outstanding work by a graduate student in the fields of Medieval and Early Modern History or Art History each year. The author of the winning paper will receive $500 and the option to have their paper published in the journal Allegorica. The prize is endowed by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Saint Louis University. Submissions are due by April 31, the winner will be announced at the Symposium.

Fons Luminis Call for Papers: “Using and Creating Digital Medievalia”

Fons Luminis, a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal edited and produced annually by graduate students at the Centre for Medieval Studies in the University of Toronto provides a forum in which to address, challenge, and explore the content and methodologies of our various home disciplines. We invite current graduate students to submit papers relating in some way to the 2015 journal theme, “Using and Creating Digital Medievalia.”

Since the mid-twentieth century, computing has been and continues to be a major factor in the medievalist’s research. From Father Busa’s creation of the Index Thomasticus in the 1940’s to current library and archival digitization projects, computational methods are essential aspects of the medievalist’s occupation. Papers are encouraged to address: medievalist use of digitally stored information; social scientists and librarians as creators and/or curators of knowledge about the Middle Ages; future directions of digital humanities; the importance of digital humanities to work in paleography, codicology, diplomatics, and text editing.

Articles may also focus on topics including (but not limited to) mapping and space, the impact of digitization on concepts of the archive, and digital tools in teaching.

Contributions may take the form of a scholarly essay or focus on the study of a particular manuscript. Articles must be written in English, follow the 16th edition (2010) of The Chicago Manual of Style, and be at least 4,000 words in length, including footnotes. Quotations in the main text in languages other than English should appear along with their English translation.

As usual, we continue to accept other submissions on any aspect of medieval studies and welcome longer review articles (approximately 1,500 words) on recent or seminal works in medieval studies. Submissions must be received by July 1, 2014 in order to be considered for publication. Inquiries and submissions (as a Word document attachment) should be sent to edsfl@chass.utoronto.ca.