AIUCD 2019 – Pedagogy, teaching, and research in the age of Digital Humanities

AIUCD 2019: Italian Conference of Digital Humanities

LOCATION: University of Udine, Udine, Italy.
DATES: 23-25 January 2019
WEBSITE: https://aiucd2019.wordpress.com/

The main topic of the AIUCD 2019 Conference is ‘Pedagogy, teaching, and research in the age of Digital Humanities’. The conference aims at reflecting on the new possibilities that the digital yields for pedagogy, teaching, and scholarly research: how will these transform teaching in the humanities? What contributions can humanistic cultural critique offer to the digital revolution? What is the connection with the digitization plan for Universities outlined by the Ministry? It also concerns the Digital Humanities as a new discipline, and this brings forward further considerations: how can the new professional figure of the digital humanist be developed? Which areas of knowledge define the Digital Humanities as a subject of study, research, and teaching? How can we recognise, classify, describe, and evaluate research efforts in the Digital Humanities?

While open to other topics related to Digital Humanities, proposals for contributions are particularly encouraged on the following:

General questions:

  • the epistemological positioning and area of knowledge of DH in relation to the systems of Academic Research Areas (Settori Scientifico-Disciplinari) and Recruiting in Italy;
  • the positioning of DH in the European and International academic systems;
  • the evaluation of research in DH beyond traditional publications;
  • dissemination, public history, and crowdsourcing within research projects;
  • the role of inter(multi-trans-cross)-disciplinary DH research in European projects, enquiry, and teaching.

Pedagogy and teaching questions:

  • teaching DH: which models, technologies, and methods?
  • teaching the humanities in secondary schools and universities with DH tools;
  • teaching DH at the University: how is it taught today?
  • DH and media: production, dissemination, and analytical prospects;
  • teaching history and DH;
  • DH and didactic strategies;
  • DH and hands-on teaching practices;
  • DH and primary source teaching;
  • Big Data methodologies and technologies in DH research and teaching.

Questions concerning research efforts:

  • statistical and quantitative research methods and their teaching applications;
  • Data Science and the role of DH in the definition of new knowledge;
  • Information science and DH: meeting points and methodological integration;
  • cultural and social impact of humanities research with computational methodologies;
  • Semantic web technologies and linked open data in the humanities;
  • models and tools for knowledge representation in the humanities and the cultural heritage sector;
  • visualization methodologies and technologies and their significance for humanities and cultural heritage knowledge and information;
  • Natural Language Processing methodologies and applications for the humanities;
  • digitization methodologies and technologies for the production, preservation, and promotion of digital cultural heritage.

DEADLINES

The deadline for submitting proposals is the 25th October 2018 (h. 23.59 CET).

Notifications of acceptance will be sent to the authors by 15th December 2018.

The official languages of the AIUCD 2019 Conference are Italian and English, but it is possible to submit a proposal also in the following languages: French, German and Spanish. In these cases, it is mandatory to provide a short abstract in English in ConfTool.

PROPOSAL CATEGORIES AND SUBMISSION

Proposals must be sent in the form of an extended abstract (see below for details), using the ConfTool conference management system, accessible at: http://www.conftool.net/aiucd2019

The Conference provides the following proposal categories:

  • long proposal (30 mins: 20 mins + 10 mins for for questions and answers): it should discuss innovative methodologies and their theoretical foundations, experiences of analysis and applications that are methodologically significant within a discipline; presentations devoted to presenting a specific tool or resource are acceptable only if they include a thorough critical discussion of the methods used and/or a theoretical evaluation of the results obtained;
  • short proposal (20 mins: 15 mins + 5 mins for questions and answers): it must present a mature research product or a research project;
  • panel (90 or 45 mins, including questions and answers): a series of presentations (maximum 6) should describe, from a theoretical and methodological point of view, a specific topic or a critical presentation of the grounding, methods and results of a big project;
  • poster: must primarily address the progress of an ongoing project or the technical details of a tool or of a digital resource;
  • workshop and tutorial: in the two days prior to the Conference, one or two workshops or tutorials on topics or tools of interest to the DH community will be accepted.

Proposals will be evaluated through double-blind peer review by scholars in the Humanities, Computer Science and/or Digital Humanities. The proposal evaluation will be carried out based on the following criteria:

  • Relevance to the topic of the conference; consistency with the Digital Humanities and Digital Culture domains.
  • Originality, relevance, or innovative approach.
  • Methodological rigour, accurate description of the methodology; the research presented should be reproducible.
  • Adequacy of the theoretical and conceptual approach to the reference domain.
  • Consistency of arguments; clear definition of the objectives; coherence between objectives and results.
  • Critical analysis of the literature; a bibliography.
  • Quality of any technical solutions proposed within the reference domain.
  • Good balance between the Humanities and Computer Science components of the research.
  • Structure of the text; quality of writing; ease of understanding; explanations of scientific language.

At the end of the evaluation process, the Program Committee may decide to move an accepted proposal to a different category of presentation.

To submit a proposal, please sign into ConfTool (http://www.conftool.net/aiucd2019). When submitting a proposal, authors must specify keywords from those suggested by the platform in order to facilitate the review process.

 

PROPOSAL STRUCTURE AND FORMATS

Proposals must clearly present the goals of the contribution, provide a brief overview of current research in the field, specify and discuss the methodology adopted and, where appropriate, the results obtained or expected. The abstracts will be published in a book with an ISBN identifier. The most promising contributions will be selected for publication as full articles in the AIUCD Umanistica Digitale journal (https://umanisticadigitale.unibo.it). Proposals must also include a short bibliography. Figures or tables may be included. The length of the proposal varies depending on the type of proposal:

  • Long paper proposal should be 1500-1800 words in length (including footnotes but excluding the bibliography);
  • Short paper and poster proposals should be 800-1000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding the bibliography);
  • Panel proposals should be 800-1000 words in length plus 200-250 words for each single presentation, (including footnotes but excluding the bibliography);
  • Workshop or tutorial proposals should be at least 1000 words and include: a title and a short description of the content and its relevance to the conference and the DH community in general, complete information of all tutors with a brief description of their research interests and previous experience, requests for technical support at the conference, and whether the workshop will have its own Call for Participation.
  • Posters should be written in Italian or English. Posters will also need to clearly present the objectives of the project, provide a brief overview of the state of the art and the methodologies adopted and, where appropriate, the results obtained or expected. They must also contain a short bibliography. The format is portrait A1 (841×594 mm). Posters will be displayed in a dedicated space at the Conference venue. Display panels will be provided. Please bring your poster already printed, as we are unable to provide a printing service. Personal laptop computers may be used in the poster exhibition area. If your presentation includes a laptop, please inform the organising committee on acceptance of your proposal. Specific poster slam sessions will be scheduled in the Conference programme to give authors the opportunity to briefly introduce (max 2 minutes) their poster.

When submitting the proposal, ConfTool also requires the provision of a short abstract (300 words). Proposals should be drafted according to the templates available at:

Word: template-abstract-AIUCD2019-en.doc
ODT: template-abstract-AIUCD2019-en.odt
which also includes editorial specifications. Valid formats are DOCX, DOC, and ODT.

Official website of the AIUCD 2019 Conference: https://aiucd2019.wordpress.com/
Official website of AIUCD: http://www.aiucd.it/

Digital Medievalist @ IMC 2019 – Call for Papers

One of the major international medievalists scholarly gatherings happens every July in Leeds: the International Medieval Congress. This year the general subject is “Materiality”, and we think that this something digital medievalists can say a lot about:

Medievalists have long been aware that the objects of their research are conditioned by their materiality —  that the shape of a charter or a manuscript is a part of its meaning. Since the 1980’s, recognition of this principle has elevated the study of material culture to a field within the broader discipline of Medieval Studies.  At the same time libraries, research institutions, and museums have been intent on producing digital catalogues and images of their collections.

The result of these initiatives is a mass of data and metadata constituting a new frontier for digital methods: 3D modeling, multispectral imaging, and Handwritten Text Recognition create new modalities of representation, while Controlled vocabularies, Linked Data, Ontologies and APIs like IIIF enhance the possibilities to model and share descriptive data. Superadded to these developments, digital methods for the interpretation of source material and presentation of research results have grown beyond the materiality of printed books and articles: data publications have started to gain traction in the community; complex visualizations tell more than a description by words, and digital editions incorporate experimental forms of interaction with research data that goes beyond the traditional forms of publication. In all of this, Medievalists have been leaders in adopting digital methods to work with the physical heritage of the Middle Ages.

Given this ferment, the Digital Medievalist community is looking for proposals presenting projects making use of these new technologies to give further – and new! – insights into the materiality of sources, and how medievalists work with cultural heritage data to understand better the impact of the digital methods on our understanding of the Middle Ages.

 

Please send your proposal (300 Words incl. a short CV) to dm.imc2019@gmail.com by Sept. 25th.

Digital Medievalist Executive Board Elections 2018 – Tally

Election can be accessed on heliosvoting.org (accessible to the voters):

Tally

Question #1
Who would you like to elect as members of the Executive Board of Digital Medievalist? (choose up to 5 candidates)

ALBERTO CAMPAGNOLO, Library of Congress –Standing for re-election– 61
JEAN-BAPTISTE CAMPS, PSL Research University 31
ROBERTO DEL MONTE, NUME International Research Group 12
FRANZ FISCHER, University of Cologne –Standing for re-election– 65
MIKE KESTEMONT, University of Antwerp –Standing for re-election– 50
LYNN RANSOM, University of Pennsylvania Libraries –Standing for re-election– 69
ERIN SEBO, Flinders University 30
ENGIN CIHAD TEKEN, Hacettepe University Technopolis 24
GEORG VOGELER, University of Graz –Standing for re-election– 52
HEATHER WACHA, University of Wisconsin, Madison 38

 

Elections 2018

Election to the DM board 2018-2020, 25th June until Sunday 6th July 2018, 23:59 GMT.

To vote in the election you must be one of the subscribers to the Digital Medievalist mailing list, . To vote, use the link and the voting token that have been sent to the email address that you have used to register to DM.
Board positions are for two year terms and incumbents may be re-elected. Members of the board are responsible for the overall direction of the organisation. This is a working board and candidates should be willing and able to commit time to Digital Medievalist.
For more information about the election procedure, board roles and bylaws, see:

https://digitalmedievalist.wordpress.com/about/
https://digitalmedievalist.wordpress.com/about/board-roles/
https://digitalmedievalist.wordpress.com/about/election-procedures/
https://digitalmedievalist.wordpress.com/about/bylaws/

Election results

2018-2020 CANDIDATES:

Alberto Campagnolo

Alberto Campagnolo trained as a book conservator (in Spoleto, Italy) and has worked in that capacity in various institutions, e.g. London Metropolitan Archives, St. Catherine’s Monastery (Egypt), and the Vatican Library. He studied Conservation of Library Materials at Ca’ Foscari University Venice, and holds an MA in Digital Culture and Technology from King’s College London. He pursued a PhD on an automated visualization of historical bookbinding structures at the Ligatus Research Centre (University of the Arts, London). He is now finishing a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship in Data Curation for Medieval Studies at the Library of Congress (Washington, DC). Alberto, in collaboration with Dot Porter (SIMS, UPenn Libraries, Philadelphia, PA), has been involved from the onset in the development of VisColl, a model and tool for the recording and visualization of the gathering structure of books in codex format. Alberto has served on the Digital Medievalist board since 2014, first as Deputy Director, and as Director since 2015.

Jean-Baptiste Camps

I started my training in digital medieval scholarship by a MA ‘Digital Technologies applied to History’ at the École des chartes in 2006-2008, with a thesis on the quantitative study of troubadour manuscripts. After working as a library curator, I did my PhD (Univ. Paris-Sorbonne) on the edition of the `Chanson d’Otinel’, with the aim to develop models to closely integrate ecdotics with digital methods (modelling, statistics, algorithmics and artificial intelligence), both for data production and analysis. I have been course leader for the master’s degree `Digital Technologies applied to History’ in 2013-2017, and now supervise the new research MA ‘Digital & Computational Humanities’ (PSL University). I teach computational philology, digital scholarly editing and  quantitative methods in the historical sciences. My main research interests are in stemmatology, stylometry, quantitative palaeography and codicology, as well as ecdotics, for Old French and Old Occitan texts and manuscripts.

Roberto Del Monte

I have a Master’s degree in History of Medieval Art, achieved in 2013 at the University of Florence, Italy (final marks 110/110 with distinction). For three years I have been leading the NUME International Research Group, developing a digital network of scholars around the world, coordinating the organization of conferences on medieval studies, the publication of specialist studies, the creation of interdisciplinary events and digital projects (e.g. the 3D reconstruction of some italian churches hit by earthquake in 2016). I’ve published articles on History of Medieval Art in Italy and France, worked with scientific journals and attended international conferences. I have experience in networking management, editing and managing digital contents: I would like to run for Journal Associate Editor, News Feed Administrator or Facebook Administrator position.

Franz Fischer

Franz Fischer has been serving on the Digital Medievalist Executive Board since 2014 and is editor-in-chief of the Digital Medievalist Journal. He is coordinator and researcher at the Cologne Center for eHumanities (CCeH), University of Cologne. He studied History, Latin and Italian in Cologne and Rome and has been awarded a doctoral degree in Medieval Latin for his digital edition of William of Auxerre’s treatise on liturgy. From 2008-2011 he created a digital edition of Saint Patrick’s Confessio at the Royal Irish Academy (RIA), Dublin. From 2013-2017 he coordinated the EU funded Marie Curie Initial Training Network on Digital Scholarly Editions DiXiT. Franz Fischer is a founding member of the Institute for Documentology and Scholarly Editing (IDE), teaching at summer schools and publishing SIDE, a series on digital editions, palaeography & codicology, and RIDE, a review journal on digital editions and resources.

Mike Kestemont

I enjoy research in computational text and image analysis for the Humanities, in particular for medieval European literature. Authorship attribution and stylistics are my main areas of expertise: in stylometry, we try to design intelligent algorithms which can automatically identify the authors of anonymous texts through the quantitative analysis of individual writing styles. I warmly recommend the documentary about this topic and which we published in the public domain: “Authorship and Stylometry: Hildegard of Bingen” (vimeo.com/70881172). I am an assistant professor (department of literature) at the University of Antwerp and regularly teach workshops on Digital Text Analysis and Programming for the Humanities. Currently, I am co-authoring a monograph on data science for humanists (with Princeton UP) and was involved in co-editing a recent special supplement of Speculum on digital medieval studies. I live in Brussels, code in Python (github.com/mikekestemont), and tweet in English (@Mike_Kestemont).

Lynn Ransom

Lynn Ransom is the Curator of Programs at the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscripts Studies at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. Since 2008 she has directed the Schoenberg Database for Manuscripts, an online, user-driven, community-maintained tool and database for the study of the movement of manuscripts across time and geography. She has also been the primary organizer for the Annual Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age since 2008. Prior to coming to Penn, Dr. Ransom has held curatorial and research positions at the Free Library of Philadelphia and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and at the Index of Christian Art at Princeton University. She received her PhD in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in 13th-century French manuscript illumination in 2001. She has published on the role of imagery in devotional practice from the 13th to the 16th century.

Erin Sebo

Erin is a specialist on Anglo-Saxon heroic poetry and historical linguistics. She has taught at Monash University (Melbourne), University College Dublin, Trinity College Dublin and Queen’s University Belfast. She is currently Lecturer in Anglo-Saxon Literature at Flinders University (Adelaide). She is a collaborator with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the study of the History of Emotion and winner of the Faculty Prize for Excellence in Teaching. Her first monograph, In Enigmate: the history of a riddle from 400-1500, is forthcoming from Four Courts Press.

Engin Cihad Tegin

He is now working on building a new digital library project called “readment.com”. Readment is unique and comprehensive multi lingual encyclopedic digital library project. Previously, he has worked as an academic advisor to the Executive Board of Hacettepe University Technopolis for electronic documents and archival sources. He completed his Ph.D. in Library and Information Science. His studies focus on European and Ottoman book history between 1450-1700. His dissertation discussed Ottoman Book Culture from the perspective of European Travellers between 1453-1699 with 122 European travellers. Engin has also built and managed Turkey’s first Digital Library Project ( pecya.com ) between 2006-2010. Pecya was funded by Turkey’s scientific state funds and it has a full text search cloud based library system with a digital copyright agreement of 220 foundations, archives and publishers in Turkey, as well as 3.5 million pages of copyrighted materials, manuscripts and rare books. Engin studies book history, digital history, digital humanities, search engine technologies and digital technologies for text mining and new text technologies. He also focuses on rare books, Ottoman manuscripts, as well as book history and prohibited books of Europe. He is a member of the Islamic manuscript Association in Cambridge and he served as the Turkish representative for the Azerbaijani Institute of Manuscripts between 2010-2013. He is also looking for a academic position outside Turkey.

Georg Vogeler

I’m a trained medievalist with a specialisation in historical auxiliary sciences. I did my PhD on late medieval tax administration records and my habilitation on the use of the charters of Emperor Frederic II in Italy. Meanwhile I got intrigued with digital methods, started the Charters Encoding Initiative (http://www.cei.lmu.de), contributed to the technical development of largest charter portal monasterium.net (http://www.monasterium.net, http://github.com/icaruseu/mom-ca), became member of the Institut für Dokumentologie und Editorik (http://www.i-d-e.de) and engaged in other fields of digital methods in medieval studies. Finally I ended up as chair for Digital Humanities at the Centre for Information Modelling at Graz University, member of the board of the digital medievalist, and member of the board of directors of the TEI. In the DM board I try to support those in the front line from the background. If reelected this would not change. But I would hope and try to put effort into, that the DM community can broaden its self perception from people being subscribed to a mailing list to enthusiasts of digital tools applied to medieval studies who are engaged in lots of activities: social media, scholarly publications, conferences, research projects.

Heather Wacha

As a CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies, I would be delighted to serve on the Digital Medievalist Executive Board. My interest and passion for the digital humanities began while I was working on my doctorate, when a GIS class showed me how to ask new research questions of my 13th-century sources. I was also interested in disseminating public history projects via digital media and decided to create a set of educational videos about medieval manuscripts.  Since then I have taken on the digital edition of a 13th-century cartulary from northern France using TEI encoding, the editing of ten mappaemundi in Digital Mappa, a software environment developed by Martin Foys, professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, the use of social network analysis for visualizing the relationships between mappaemundi and their textual sources, and the multispectral imaging of stains (#StainAlive). For medievalists, it is crucial we continue to recognize the benefits of using digital technologies to advance scholarship in our discipline and I see my present and future careers continuing to inform myself and helping others put these technologies into practice.

 

What do digital medievalists do?

As is often the case in the Digital Humanities landscape, outsiders find it difficult to imagine what kind of work a digital medievalist would engage with. If the term Digital Humanities is often perceived as an oxymoron, this is even more so for Digital Medievalist. Digital and medieval do not seem to go together, and yet, as we know, they complement each other in our projects.

Digital Medievalist (DM) was born in 2003 as a project and an international ‘community of practice’ dedicated to the development and dissemination of best practice in the use of technology in Medieval Studies[1]. In 2005, the Digital Medievalist Journal (DMJ) was added as a more formal component of DM. A review of the papers published in DMJ and of the posts and webpages here at digitalmedievalist.org provides an idea and an overview of our scholarly activities. Digital archives, digital palaeography and codicology projects, medieval corpora, textual analysis and editions are among the most prominent activities, but DM does not wish to be solely involved in medieval manuscript culture. A recent review[2] of a project on Gothic Architecture is an example of the breath of activities carried out by digital medievalists.

To start a reflection on the scholarly interests and endeavours lead by members of our community, we are launching a series of blog-posts written by digital medievalists from around the world, focussing on some aspects of their research, and showcasing their particular views of the Digital Medievalist landscape.

We begin with contributions by a group of early career researchers who are (or have been) engaged in research projects as part of a series of postdocs in Data Curation for Medieval Studies, organized by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and funded by the Mellon Foundation.

 

We would like to take this opportunity to encourage other researchers engaged in projects that fall within the umbrella of Digital Medievalist interests to contact us and submit blog-post proposals.


[1] Paul O’Donnell, D., (2005). Welcome to The Digital Medievalist. Digital Medievalist. 1. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/dm.1

[2] Werwie, K., (2017). Stephen Murray and Andrew Tallon, 2012-. Mapping Gothic France. http://mappinggothic.org/. Digital Medievalist. 10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/dm.54