The Itinerary of King John & the Rotuli Litterarum Patentium

The Itinerary of King John project was originally designed to be simply a more convenient way to access the scanned pages and indexes of the Rotuli Litterarum Patentium on the internet. The project soon incorporated a dynamic timeline using software from the “Simile” project at MIT. This chronological visualization drew its data from Thomas D. Hardy’s “Itinerary of John” which appeared along with his “Introduction to the Patent Rolls” in the 1835 edition of the Rot. Lit. Pat. The timeline links each stop on John’s itinerary with the relevant pages of the Patent Rolls.

The original geographical component for this online resource was crude because the itinerary locations were automatically geocoded using Google’s API which knew nothing of medieval British place names or sources. As a result, only about 60% of the sites listed in Hardy’s itinerary were plotted on the map, and a goodly proportion of them were wildly inaccurate. This resource has now been updated. Thanks to Janet Gillespie’s generous gift of data, geographical coordinates and reference data for all of the sites appearing in Hardy’s “Itinerary” are now accessible from the dynamic timeline and map.

The project is available at: http://neolography.com/timelines/JohnItinerary.html

Digital Medievalist Journal update

Dear digital medievalists,

We are very pleased to announce the publication of two highly instructive review articles in Digital Medievalist:

(1) A review on the fourth edition of Kiernan’s Electronic Beowulf – by Stephen Carrell, Gwendolyn Davidson, Virgil Grandfield and Daniel Paul O’Donnell: http://www.digitalmedievalist.org/journal/10/copland/

(2) A review on the CATview tool for visualizing text alignment – by Gioele Barabucci: http://www.digitalmedievalist.org/journal/10/barabucci/

Enjoy reading Digital Medievalist: http://www.digitalmedievalist.org/journal/

DigiPal Launch Party

Date: Tuesday 7th October 2014
Time: 5.45pm until the wine runs out
Venue: Council Room, King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS
Co-sponsor: Centre for Late Antique & Medieval studies, KCL
Register your place at http://digipallaunch.eventbrite.co.uk 

After four years, the DigiPal project is finally coming to an end. To celebrate this, we are having a launch party at King’s College London on Tuesday, 7 October. The programme is as follows:

  • Welcome: Stewart Brookes and Peter Stokes
  • Giancarlo Buomprisco: “Shedding Some Light(box) on Medieval Manuscripts”
  • Elaine Treharne (via Skype)
  • Donald Scragg: “Beyond DigiPal”
  • Q & A with the DigiPal team

If you’re in the area then do register and come along for the talks and a free drink (or two) in celebration. Registration is free but is required to manage numbers and ensure that we have enough drink and nibbles to go around.

If you’re not familiar with DigiPal already, we have been been developing new methods for the analysis of medieval handwriting. There’s much more detail about the project on our website, including one post of the DigiPal project blog which summarises the website and its functionality. Quoting from that, you can:

 Do have a look at the site and let us know what you think. And – just as importantly – do come and have a drink on us if you are in London on Tuesday!

The DigiPal Team

Digital Manuscript Projects

Homepage

Description

A list of current digital manuscript projects and reconstructions of medieval libraries. The list is organized by location and updated regularly. It forms part of the Monastic Manuscript Project.

The webpage also contains a list of research tools for the study of early medieval monasticism.

Keywords

  • Languages: Latin
  • Countries: Europe, US, Canada
  • Dates: middle ages
  • Disciplines: paleography, manuscript studies

Links and references

Contact

Albrecht Diem, Dept. of History, Syracuse University

Hildemar Project

Homepage

http://www.hildemar.org/

Description

The Hildemar Project is a collaborative translation project of Hildemar of Corbie’s Expositio in Regulam Sancti Benedicti, a 650 pages long sentence-by-sentence commentary to the Rule of Benedict.

The website presents the Latin text in the edition of Ruppert Mittermüller (Regensburg 1880) along with an English translation. The task of translating this work is shared by a group of about 50 classicists and medieval scholars. List of contributors.

The text will contain hyperlinks to other versions of the commentary and to digized manuscripts. The page contains a bibliography on Hildemar of Corbie and a discussion forum. The purpose of this project is to make Hildemar’s Commenatary, a key text for the history of monasticism, accessible to scholars and students. The presentation will facilitate students with very little knowledge of Latin to work with the original text and to do manuscript studies.

 

Keywords

  • Languages: Latin, English
  • Countries: Germany, Italy
  • Dates: 9th century
  • Names: Hildemar of Corbie, Ps.-Basil, Ps.-Paul the Deacon
  • Disciplines (history, linguistics, literature, paleography…): Medieval History, Monastic Stduies, Manuscript Studies

Links and references

Team

Contact

Albrecht Diem