Georg Vogeler

Georg Vogeler

I’m a trained medievalist with a specialisation in historical auxiliary sciences. I did my PhD on late medieval tax administration records and my habilitation on the use of the charters of Emperor Frederic II in Italy.

Meanwhile I got intreagued with digital methods, started the Charters Encoding Initiative (http://www.cei.lmu.de), contributed to the technical development of largest charter portal monasterium.net (http://www.monasterium.net, http://github.com/icaruseu/mom-ca), became member of the Institut für Dokumentologie und Editorik (http://www.i-d-e.de) and engaged in other fields of digital methods in medieval studies. Finally I ended up as chair for Digital Humanities at the Centre for Information Modelling at Graz University and member of the board of the digital medievalist. In the DM board I try to support those in the front line from the background. If reelected this would not change. But I would hope and try to put effort into, that the DM community can broaden its self perception from people being subscribed to a mailing list to enthusiasts of digital tools applied to medieval studies who are engaged in lots of activities: social media, scholarly publications, conferences, research projects.

Lynn Ransom

Lynn Ransom

Lynn Ransom is the Curator of Programs at the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscripts Studies at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. Since 2008, she has directed the Schoenberg Database for Manuscripts, which is currently being redeveloped into an online, user-driven, community-maintained tool for the study of the movement of manuscripts across time and geography. She has also been the primary organizer for the Annual Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age since 2008. Prior to coming to Penn, Dr. Ransom has held curatorial and research positions at the Free Library of Philadelphia and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and at the Index of Christian Art at Princeton University. She received her PhD in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in 13th-century French manuscript illumination in 2001. She has published on the role of imagery in devotional practice from the 13th to the 16th century.

Gene Lyman

Gene Lyman

After significant service as a senior university administrator in charge of funds development and public outreach, Gene Lyman returned to his first passion – the scholarly study and promotion of medieval literature.  His Ph.D. thesis,  University of Virginia, 2009, addressed reconfiguring  scholarly editions in digital environments with particular emphasis on how findings in cognitive science can make these editions more reliable and useful than their printed counterparts.  Lyman received his B.A. at Yale in the interdisciplinary major, History, the Arts, and Letters. He has presented papers at conferences in North America and Europe on subjects of special importance to digital editorial theory and practice, late medieval scribal practices, Chaucer, and the development of software for display and analysis of scholarly texts.  He is currently the Medieval Academy of America’s Treasurer, Finance Committee Chair, a Centennial Committee member, and ex officio member of its Executive Committee.  He created the Elwood Viewer for the Piers Plowman Electronic Archive, where he also an editor. He is currently the Reviews Editor for DM.

Mike Kestemont

Mike Kestemont

I enjoy research in computational text and image analysis for the Humanities, in particular for medieval European literature. Authorship attribution and stylistics are my main areas of expertise: in stylometry, we try to design intelligent algorithms which can automatically identify the authors of anonymous texts through the quantitative analysis of individual writing styles. I warmly recommend the documentary about this topic and which we published in the public domain: “Authorship and Stylometry: Hildegard of Bingen” (vimeo.com/70881172). I am an assistant professor (department of literature) at the University of Antwerp and regularly teach workshops on Digital Text Analysis and Programming for the Humanities. Currently, I am co-authoring a monograph on data science for humanists (with Princeton UP) and co-editing a special supplement of Speculum on digital medieval studies. I live in Brussels, code in Python (github.com/mikekestemont), and tweet in English (@Mike_Kestemont).

Torsten Hiltmann

Torsten Hiltmann

Torsten Hiltmann studied History, Philosophy and Psychology at the Technical University of Dresden and holds a PhD degree in Medieval History from TU Dresden and the École pratique des hautes études (EPHE) in Paris (co-tutelle). He collaborated in several database and editorial projects at the German Historical Institute Paris, before he changed to the University of Münster where he is now a Juniorprofessor for High and Late Medieval History and Auxiliary sciences. He is specialised in medieval manuscripts, courtly culture and visual communication. In his current research project he explores medieval heraldic communication from the perspective of cultural history.

In the field of Digital Humanities he focuses on the use of computational methods in auxiliary sciences, with regard to textual as well as visual sources. He is especially interested in semantic web technologies, digital editions and NLP, as well as methodological reflections about DH, and is developing and conducting several projects in these domains. Besides that he is editor of the academic blog “Heraldica nova”.