Tag Archives: Course or Workshop

Training School: Creation and Use of Medieval Textual Corpora (16-24 Sep. 2014)

TRAINING SCHOOL
Creation and Use of Medieval Textual Corpora
16th-24th september 2014
Ciutadella, Menorca (Spain)

Scientific programme: Bruno BON (CNRS-IRHT, France), Krzysztof NOWAK (IJP-PAN, Poland). Local organiser : Susanna ALLÉS TORRENT (CSIC-IMF, Barcelona).

Teachers : Renaud ALEXANDRE (France), Maciej EDER (Poland), Alain GUERREAU (France), Nicolas PERREAUX (France), Bénédicte PINCEMIN (France).

The COST “Medioevo Europeo” (http://www.medioevoeuropeo.org) Working Group 3
(Dictionaries and texts) is organising a six-day training school that will provide an introduction to
the creation and use of textual corpora in the historical and linguistic research.
This summer school is intended for all students and researchers working on medieval textual data,
with a (limited) knowledge of IT tools. The purpose of our training school is to show, in theory
and practice, how to assemble, encode and analyse digitised medieval texts.

The first day will provide an overview of the Linux environment, and will be followed by a full day on the creation of an annotated textual corpus (day 2). The third and fourth days will be devoted to textual
analysis, followed by a day on statistical analysis tools (day 5). The last day will focus on the relationship between corpora and lexicography and related issues (day 6).
Participants should bring their own personal computers (with at least 20 Gb of free space), and a
digital copy of the texts they plan to work on. Most courses will be taught in French, but technical
support will be offered in other European languages (German, English, Spanish, Catalan, French, Italian and Polish) as well.

Application and Enrollment: Scientific committee will select max. 20 students (Note: Students
must be citizens of one of COST Countries (http://www.cost.eu/about_cost/cost_countries).
Please send applications consisting of a cover letter and a CV to Susanna Allés Torrent
(susannalles@imf.csic.es – subject: “Registration Training School”) before March 31th 2014. The
courses will be free of charge, but transport and accommodation are to be paid by the trainees;
accommodations up to 40 € per night are available. With the European COST funding, ten participants are eligible for a grant of about 600 €.
URL : http://www.glossaria.eu/minorque

Posted by: Dominique Stutzmann (dominique.stutzmann@irht.cnrs.fr).

Medieval and Modern Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age (MMSDA)

Medieval and Modern Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age (MMSDA) 28 April – 2 May 2014, Cambridge and London

With apologies for cross-posting, we are very pleased to announce the fifth year of this course, funded by the Digital Scholarly Editions Initial Training Network (DiXiT), and run by DiXiT with the Institute of English Studies (London), the University of Cambridge, the Warburg Institute, and King’s College London. For the first time, the course will run in two parallel strands: one on medieval and the other on modern manuscripts.

The course is open to any arts and humanities doctoral students working with manuscripts. It involves five days of intensive training on the analysis, description and editing of medieval or modern manuscripts to be held jointly in Cambridge and London. Participants will receive a solid theoretical foundation and hands-on experience in cataloguing and editing manuscripts for both print and digital formats.

The first half of the course involves morning classes and then afternoon visits to libraries in Cambridge and London. Participants will view original manuscripts and gain practical experience in applying the morning’s themes to concrete examples. In the second half we will address the cataloguing and description of manuscripts in a digital format with particular emphasis on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). These sessions will also combine theoretical principles and practical experience and include supervised work on computers.

The course is free of charge but is open only to doctoral students (PhD or equivalent). It is aimed at those writing dissertations relating to medieval or modern manuscripts, especially those working on literature, art or history. Some bursaries will be available for travel and accommodation. There are eighteen vacancies across the medieval and modern strands, and preference will be given to those considered by the selection panel likely to benefit most from the course. Applications close on 14 February 2014 but early registration is strongly recommended.

For further details see dixit-mmsda.

- Please circulate widely! -

Posted by: Peter Stokes (peter.stokes@kcl.ac.uk).

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 28-May 1, 2014

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, London, April 28-May 1, 2014. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday, February 21st, 2014.

Posted by: Gabriel BODARD (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Strumenti digitali per edizioni critiche a stampa – Vercelli, 13-14 giugno 2013

Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale – DigilibLT

Scuola estiva
Strumenti digitali per edizioni critiche a stampa
Vercelli, 13-14 giugno 2013
Corso Garibaldi 98
Palazzo Tartara – Sala delle Colonne

NB: la partecipazione è soggetta ad iscrizione; chi vuole partecipare deve scrivere info@digiliblt.unipmn.it per ricevere le informazioni necessarie

Programma

13 giugno
ore 9-9,15: saluti

ore 9,30-12,30: Raffaella Tabacco, Francesco Stella, Roberto Rosselli del Turco, Questioni e problemi aperti in filologia classica, medievale, digitale

ore 14,30-18,30: Wilhelm Ott, TUSTEP

14 giugno

ore 9 – 12,30: Guido Milanese, Script in LaTeX

ore 14,30 -18: Stefan Hagel, CTE

ore 18-18,30: Maurizio Lana, consegna attestati, saluti

I docenti

Raffaella Tabacco insegna letteratura latina all’Università del Piemonte Orientale ed è responsabile del progetto della biblioteca digitale digilibLT

Stefan Hagel, studioso di musica e strumenti musicali della Grecia Classica, è autore di CTE – Classical Text Editor

Guido Milanese insegna istituzioni di cultura classica ed europea, e linguistica computazionale all’Università Cattolica; sta per pubblicare un libro sull’uso di LaTeX per la produzione di edizioni critiche a stampa

Wilhelm Ott ha insegnato elaborazione dati per discipline umanistiche all’Università di Tubinga ed ha iniziato e diretto lo sviluppo di TUSTEP

Roberto Rosselli del Turco insegna filologia germanica all’Università di Torino e codifica di testi nel corso di laurea in Informatica Umanistica dell’Università di Pisa; dirige il progetto Vercelli Book Digitale (http://vbd. humnet.unipi.it/) e condirige il progetto Visionary Cross (http://www.visionarycross.org/).

Francesco Stella dirige il Master in Edizione digitale all’Università di Siena; ha curato nel 2007 il volume Digital Philology and Medieval Texts e coordina progetti e ricerche di informatica umanistica.

Per contatti e informazioni

Progetto digilibLT, diretto da Raffaella Tabacco (responsabile) e Maurizio Lana. Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale, Via Manzoni 8 – 13100 Vercelli, e-mail: progetto@digiliblt.unipmn.it con la collaborazione di
Dipartimento di Filologia, Linguistica e Tradizione Classica “A. Rostagni”, Università degli Studi di Torino Via S. Ottavio 20 – 10124 Torino

Posted by: Timoty Leonardi (timoty.leonardi@tesorodelduomovc.it).

Workshop: XML-TEI for Ancient and Medieval Lexicographical Works

The Glossarium Mediae Latinitatis Cataloniae project (Milà i Fontanals Institution, CSIC – Universitat de Barcelona) has the pleasure to announce the “Workshop: XML-TEI for Ancient and Medieval Lexicographical Works”, which will take place from the 15th to the 17th May 2013 in Barcelona.
You can find all the information about our workshop by following the link: http://gmlc.imf.csic.es/2013/Workshop/ Kind regards,

Posted by: Susanna Allés Torrent (susannalles@imf.csic.es).

EpiDoc Workshop 22-25 April 2013

EpiDoc Workshop 22-25 April 2013

Applications are invited for a 4-day training workshop on digital text-markup for epigraphic and papyrological editing, to be held in the Institute for Classical Studies, London. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), James Cowey (Heidelberg) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and Curse Tablets from Roman Britain, Pandektis (inscriptions of Macedonia and Thrace), and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML and markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object description in EpiDoc as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor too (papyri.info).

No technical skills are required to apply, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday 1 March 2013.

Posted by: Gabriel BODARD (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Interdisciplinary Workshop “Scholarly Editions in the Digital Age: Text and Music”

31 August – 1 September

http://blogs.music.indiana.edu/chmtl/2012/08/16/interdisciplinary-workshop-august-31-september-1/

Digital editions have already begun to drastically change the work of scholars, but many questions of method, technology, academic recognition, remain open. This workshop will draw together scholars from a variety of fields to present and discuss their diverse experiences in digital scholarly publication, and aims to answer such questions as the following: what are the advantages of a digital edition, compared with a traditional one? How difficult is to create a digital edition today, and what type of collaboration between different scholars does it entail? Are the standard techniques used by scholars sufficient/suitable for all purposes? How are different fields (Literature, History, Music, etc.) benefiting or not benefiting from the possibilities of this new medium? Finally: are electronic editions advanced enough, and well-regarded enough by scholars and institutions to suggest that the age of printed editions is coming to an end?

The workshop, organized jointly by the Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature (CHMTL) and the Medieval Studies Institute (MEST) of Indiana University will have a special, albeit not exclusive, focus on medieval and Early modern themes and materials. During the workshop new initiatives of the CHMTL will be presented, stemming from one of the oldest projects of the center, the Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum.

Posted by: Giuliano Di Bacco (gdibacco@indiana.edu).

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age (MMSDA) 2012

Apologies for cross-posting.

Please note that the course is now open to PhD students from any COST country (essentially Europe and Israel), and includes bursaries for travel and accommodation.

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the fourth year of ‘Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age’, an intensive course for PhD students jointly funded by COST and the AHRC, and run in collaboration with King’s College London, the Warburg Institute, and the University of Cambridge.

The course is open to arts and humanities doctoral students registered at institutions in any of the thirty-six COST countries. It involves five days of intensive training on the analysis, description and editing of medieval manuscripts in the digital age to be held jointly in Cambridge and London. Participants will receive a solid theoretical foundation and hands-on experience in cataloguing and editing manuscripts for both print and digital formats.

The first half of the course involves morning classes and then visits to libraries in Cambridge and London in the afternoons. Participants will view original manuscripts and gain practical experience in applying the morning’s themes to concrete examples. In the second half we will address the cataloguing and description of manuscripts in a digital format with particular emphasis on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). These sessions will also combine theoretical principles and practical experience and include supervised work on computers.

The course is free of charge but is open only to doctoral students registered at institutions in COST countries. It is aimed at those writing dissertations which relate to medieval manuscripts, especially those on literature, art and history. Some bursaries will be available for travel and accommodation, courtesy of COST, to be assigned based on an even distribution of nationality and gender. Places on the course are limited to twenty. *Applications close on 13 January 2012* but early registration is strongly recommended.

For further details see http://ies.sas.ac.uk/StudyAndResearchTraining/MMSDA/ or contact Dr Peter Stokes at mmsda@sas.ac.uk.

Funding for this course is generously provided by the AHRC’s Collaborative Training Scheme and by COST Action IS1005, ‘Medieval Europe – Medieval Cultures and Technological Resources’.

Posted by: Peter Stokes (peter.stokes@kcl.ac.uk).

EpiDoc Training Workshop

EpiDoc Training Workshop
5-8 September 2011
Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London

An EpiDoc training workshop will be offered by the Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London, and the Institute for Classical Studies in September this year. The workshop is free of charge and open to all, but spaces are limited and registration as soon as possible is essential.

This workshop is an introduction to the use of EpiDoc, an XML schema for the encoding and publication of inscriptions, papyri and other documentary Classical texts. Participants will study the use of EpiDoc markup to record the distinctions expressed by the Leiden Conventions and traditional critical editions, and some of the issues in translating between EpiDoc and the major epigraphic and papyrological databases. They will also be given hands-on experience in the use of the Papyrological Editor tool implemented by the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, which facilitates the authoring EpiDoc XML via a ‘tags-free’ interface.

The course is targeted at scholars of epigraphy and papyrology (from advanced graduate students to professors) with an interest and willingness to learn some of the hands-on technical aspects necessary to run a digital project. Knowledge of Greek and/or Latin, the Leiden Conventions and the distinctions expressed by them, and the kinds of data that need to be recorded by philologists and ancient historians, will be assumed. No particular technical expertise is required.

Places on the EpiDoc training week are limited so if you are interested in attending the workshop or have any questions, please contact charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk and gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk as soon as possible with a brief statement of qualifications and interest.

Digital Research and Editing Environments Workshop

Digital Research and Editing Environments Workshop
Event type:
Workshop
Date:
7 July 2011

This workshop will run from 12.30 to 4.30pm, with lunch provided.

Please contact Donna Baillie (see below) if you would like to attend.

Digital Research and Editing Environments offer humanities researchers the opportunity to extend the range of methodologies open to them through the use of advanced online text analysis tools. However, their adoption remains highly localised and unevenly distributed because of, among other things, lack of awareness, the inappropriate configuration of editing tools, lack of institutional support, and the instability and unfamiliarity of interfaces.

This workshop will look at the current state of the field from three viewpoints:
• the researcher, open to learning new skills but wary of the transience, inflexibility and insecurity of some services;
• the editor, looking to broaden the reach of his or her published output, but requiring complex and sometimes bespoke workflows
• the technologist, eager to understand researchers’ needs but unsure how these will develop and change over time

For those attending the workshop, issues arising from the speakers’ presentations will be discussed in an ‘Ideas Café’, which will be followed by an open discussion session. While this workshop will be particularly useful for practitioners currently working on or with Digital Research and Editing Environments, the IHR actively invites contributions from researchers and scholars who may have further observations, experience of, or different insights into the adoption of these new tools and technologies. Parts of the workshop will be live streamed through the IHR’s History SPOT service, with an option to contribute in real time, allowing interested parties who cannot attend to ask questions during the open discussion.

Speaker biographies:

Mark Hedges is Deputy Director of the Centre for e-Research (CeRch) at King’s College London, and prior to this was Technical Manager at the Arts and Humanities Data Service (AHDS#. Mark took the lead in the planning, design and development of the repository-based infrastructure to support the curation, preservation and delivery of the diverse and complex digital resources managed by the AHDS, and since October 2007 he has been extending the scope of the work to providing a comprehensive, cross-disciplinary research infrastructure for King’s.

Rob Iliffe is the Director of the AHRC Newton Papers Project with an overall responsibility for completing the online publication of all four million words of Newton’s Theological Papers. He is also responsible for extending the scope of the original project to include dealing with Newton’s scientific and mathematical work. Rob gained his PhD from Cambridge University and is currently Professor of Intellectual History and the History of Science at the University of Sussex. He is the author of A Very Short Introduction to Isaac Newton #Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007#, and has published extensively on early modern history and the history of science. He is currently completing a major work on Newton’s theology for online release.

Philip Schofield is Professor of the History of Legal and Political Thought, Director of the Bentham Project, Chair of the Bentham Seminar, and General Editor of the Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham. In 2010 the Bentham Project was awarded a Digital Equipment and Database Enhancement for Impact #DEDEFI) Award from the AHRC to launch the Bentham Papers Transcription Initiative, or Transcribe Bentham for short. The Bentham Project, in collaboration with the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, the University of London Computer Centre, UCL Library Services and UCL Learning and Media Services, has created a Transcription Desk where volunteer users can log-in and transcribe previously unstudied and unpublished manuscripts from the Bentham Papers collection in UCL Library’s Special Collections.

Jane Winters has been Head of Publications at the Institute of Historical Research since 1999, and of the new IHR Digital since the autumn of 2010. She is responsible for the IHR’s publishing and scholarly communications strategy, including the management of a range of research projects focusing on the provision of digital resources for historians. Currently, she is Co-Director of the JISC-funded Connected Histories project; Principal Investigator of the AHRC-funded Early English Laws project to digitize Anglo-Saxon legal texts; and Publishing Editor of the Bibliography of British and Irish History. She is also Executive Editor of the IHR’s journal, Historical Research.

URL:
http://www.livestream.com/historyspot

Event Location:
Wolfson Room, Institute of Historical Research
Malet Street Senate House, North Block
London WC1E 7HU
United Kingdom

Contact details:
Donna Baillie
donna.baillie@sas.ac.uk

Posted by: Donna Baillie (donna.baillie@sas.ac.uk).

Oxford Digital Humanities Summer School July 25-29th

This is a reminder that we are running a comprehensive 5 day Summer School in Digital Humanities this summer.

It takes place from July 25th-29th, at Oxford University Computing Services and Wolfson College.

The summer school introduces a range of digital research components to researchers, project managers, research assistants, or students working on any kind of project concerned with the creation or management of digital data for the humanities.

Please visit http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/DHSS2011/ for details.

The summer school is a collaboration for Digital.Humanities@Oxford between Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS),Oxford e-Research Centre (OERC), e-Research South, and Wolfson College Digital Research Cluster, under the direction of Sebastian Rahtz and Dr James Cummings at OUCS.

The programme will consist of:

• Two parallel streams of morning practical sessions using the well-equipped It teaching facilities at OUCS
• Two parallel streams of afternoon workshops at Wolfson College concentrating on techniques and best practice • Guest lectures from Digital Humanities experts about their research projects

Our guest plenary speakers for this year include:

David De Roure, Professor of e-Science at OeRC
Jeni Tennison, UK eGov guru
John Coleman, Director of the Phonetics Laboratory
Min Chen, Professor of Visualization at OeRC
Ray Siemens, Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and Professor of English at the University of Victoria

Topics include:
• Best practice for digital linguistic corpora
• Building queryable document-based websites
• Creating community collections and digital outreach
• Creating digital texts in XML using the TEI
• Working with maps
• Critical apparatus and digital genetic editions in TEI
• Database design for humanities projects
• Digital Images for the Humanities
• Digital library technologies and best practice
• Getting funding: quality, impact, sustainability.
• Introduction to copyright and open licensing
• Introduction to document/project modelling
• Introduction to XML databases
• Managing Digital Humanities Projects
• Practical RDF modelling and conversion
• Publishing XML files using XSLT
• RDF querying and visualization
• TEI for linking text and facsimiles
• Tools for analyzing linguistic corpora
• Visualization using jQuery
• Working with audio files

Posted by: James Cummings (dhss@oucs.ox.ac.uk).

Research databases in the humanities: where next? A half-day workshop, 21st January, 2 011

What are the issues that researchers in the Humanities face when compiling data, and how can technology help or hinder? This workshop will look at the ways in which humanities researchers build, maintain, and preserve databases, along with the processes currently in place to support such activities. It will consider what tools could be developed to support the creation and use of research data, how data from different sources might be linked, and, where relevant, the role that public or private cloud services might play.

The workshop will be primarily concerned with the processes of creating databases for humanities research. As such it will be of interest to humanities researchers who are working with or considering developing research databases and who wish to stay abreast of the latest developments and opportunities. It is also likely to appeal to technologists involved in the provision of research services. We hope to provide a forum in which ideas can be exchanged and new approaches to humanities data illustrated.

The workshop is being organised as part of the Sudamih Project (Supporting Data Management Infrastructure in the Humanities), funded by the JISC.

Workshop website: http://sudamih.oucs.ox.ac.uk/databases_workshop.xml

Please register via the website or by emailing sudamih@oucs.ox.ac.uk

Date: Friday 21st January, 2011.
Location: Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford, OX1 2JA.

A buffet lunch will be provided from 12 noon, with the workshop itself commencing at 1pm and concluding by 4:45pm. There is no charge for attending the workshop.

Posted by: James A J Wilson (james.wilson@oucs.ox.ac.uk).

Digital Humanities in the Computer Science Department at Tufts University

Digital Humanities in the Computer Science Department at Tufts University PLEASE CIRCULATE

Computer Science has played a critical role in many areas of inquiry, but nowhere are the potential implications greater than in the Humanities. We are transforming the ways in which we can relate to the past and understand the relationship of that past to the world in which we live. We need a new generation of researchers who can develop new methods from the computational sciences to advance the intellectual life of humanity.

The presence of the Perseus Project (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu) at Tufts since 1992 has allowed Tufts play a significant role in the emerging field of Digital Humanities. The Tufts Department of Computer Science (http://www.cs.tufts.edu/) now provides unique opportunities for emerging researchers with an interest in the Digital Humanities to develop those interests within the department of Computer Science, combining rigorous course work with opportunities to develop projects relevant to various areas within the humanities. Tufts can support a wide range of backgrounds and career goals.

Undergraduates at Tufts and elsewhere with an interest in Digital Humanities are encouraged to combine either a major or a minor in Computer Science with another area of the Humanities. Such a combination will provide a foundation for undergraduate research projects of tangible value.

Students who have a strong humanities background and wish to develop a rigorous foundation in Computer Science for subsequent Digital Humanities work are encouraged to consider the Post-Baccalaureate Minor Program in Computer Science (http://www.cs.tufts.edu/academics/cs_minor_grad). The Post-Bac CS Minor will enable students either to pursue subsequent graduate work in Computer Science or lay the foundations for Digital Humanities research within a graduate program in the humanities.

More advanced students may consider the Masters Program in Computer Science. This can either lead to a Phd program in Computer Science or an area within the Humanities but it can also prepare students for work developing the digital infrastructures within libraries, cultural institutions, and major media.

The Tufts Phd Program in Computer Science provides a framework in which students with a strong background in some area of the Humanities can develop research and teaching agendas that bridge the gap between Computer Science and areas within the Humanities. A Phd in Computer Science at Tufts can give you a unique position in revolutionizing the intellectual life of humanity. More information will become available with an update on http://www.cs.tufts.edu. For more information, students can contact digitalhumanities@cs.tufts.edu.

Posted by: Daniel Paul O’Donnell (daniel.odonnell@uleth.ca).

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age (MMSDA) 2011

For PhD students based in the UK:

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age (MMSDA): 2-6 May 2011

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the third year of this AHRC-funded course in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, the Warburg Institute, and King’s College London.

The course is open to arts and humanities doctoral students registered at UK institutions. It involves five days of intensive training on the analysis, description and editing of medieval manuscripts in the digital age to be held jointly in Cambridge and London. Participants will receive a solid theoretical foundation and hands-on experience in cataloguing and editing manuscripts for both print and digital formats.

The first part of the course involves morning classes and then visits to libraries in Cambridge and London in the afternoons. Participants will view original manuscripts and gain practical experience in applying the morning’s themes to concrete examples. In the second part we will address the cataloguing and description of manuscripts in a digital format with particular emphasis on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). These sessions will also combine theoretical principles and practical experience and include supervised work on computers.

The course is aimed principally at those writing dissertations which relate to medieval manuscripts, especially those on literature, art and history. There are no fees, but priority will be given to PhD students funded by the AHRC. Class sizes are limited to twenty and places are ‘first-come-first-served’ so early registration is strongly recommended.

For further details see http://ies.sas.ac.uk/study/mmsda/ or contact Dr Peter Stokes at mmsda@sas.ac.uk.

Posted by: Peter Stokes (peter.stokes@kcl.ac.uk).

Digital Humanities Workshops at Brown University

The Brown University Women Writers Project is pleased to announce a new series of workshops on topics in TEI encoding and tools for digital humanists. These workshops are aimed at humanities faculty, librarians, students, and anyone interested in getting a strong introduction to digital humanities concepts, methods, and tools. Each workshop combines hands-on practice with discussion and lectures, and participants are encouraged to work with their own project materials. These small group events offer a wonderful opportunity to learn about other digital projects as well as to master important methods and concepts in an exploratory setting.

More information, including detailed workshop descriptions and registration information, can be found at http://www.wwp.brown.edu/encoding/workshops/.

Students and members of the TEI consortium receive a 33% discount on registration.

All workshops are held at Brown University and are led by Julia Flanders, Syd Bauman, and John Melson.

July 21-23, 2010
Introduction to TEI
$450 ($300 for students and TEI members)

August 16-18, 2010
Introduction to TEI Customization
$450 ($300 for students and TEI members)

September 24-25, 2010
Introduction to Manuscript Encoding with TEI
$300 ($200 for students and TEI members)

November 5-6, 2010
Essential Tools for Digital Scholarship
$300 ($200 for students and TEI members)

December 3-4, 2010
Introduction to Manuscript Encoding with TEI
$300 ($200 for students and TEI members)

Coming in 2011: Introduction to XSLT

We hope to see you in Providence!

Julia Flanders
Director, Women Writers Project
Center for Digital Initiatives, Brown University Library
http://www.wwp.brown.edu/
http://library.brown.edu/cds/

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

Workshop to be held at the Hypertext 2010 conference at Victoria College in Toronto, CA

“Hypertext 2010” 21st ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia at Victoria College, part of the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada on June 13-16, 2010  http://www.ht2010.org/index.html

One of the activities during the conference will be a workshop “Rhetorical and Semantic Possibilities of Links: Cultural and Literary Applications of Links” on Sunday, June 13. Anyone who wants to understand how a link can express meaning and how we use links to communicate (for example, elit writers and readers, social media developers, web developers, and … you … ) is encouraged to attend.  If you are interested in attending, you are encouraged to submit a position paper by Friday, April 30, 2010 to deenalarsen@yahoo.com.  This paper should address your background, experience in hypertext and hypermedia, and questions that you wish to address have concerning how links work in communication. Notifications will be by Monday, May 3 and the last day for early bird registrations is Wednesday, May 5.

Mark Bernstein has written that the link is “the most important new punctuation mark since the comma.” More than that, the link actually conveys meaning.  But how do people use links to communicate ideas? This workshop is designed to uncover the semantic value of the link and its potential rhetorical effects.  We want to know what has been the cultural, literary, rhetorical, and semantic impact of the link to date, and what future effects can we anticipate and bring about.  We will explore the link in hands-on exercises and examinations of electronic literature and other hypermedia examples.  Ideally, the audience will be broad, composed of anyone who wants to develop a further understanding of this tool.

We seek to network amongst ourselves and to continue the dialogue between the creative members of the hypertext community and those who make the software that enables expression.  Exploring how links work will help create new foundations for Hypermedia and Web 2.0 environments (social linking, mapping, visualizing, network linking, etc), studies on adaptive hypermedia (adaptive navigation such as link hiding, linking used in recommendation strategies, and linking methods for personalized libraries and e-learning), highlight our understanding of links as a new component of writing and communication, and increase our understanding of the ways that they are used in education, research, journalism, and literature.

For more information, please email deenalarsen@yahoo.com.

Mary Stromme
PhD Candidate, English
University of North Dakota
Editorial Assistant, The Oral History Review
ohr.oxfordjournals.org
mary.stromme@gmail.com

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

Registration Open: DHO Workshops at NUIG

The DHO is pleased to offer a three-day series of workshops in collaboration with the Moore Institute, NUI, Galway. These will be of interest to humanities scholars who wish to learn about text encoding, manuscript encoding, and digital resources useful for research and teaching in Irish Studies.

‘Text Encoding with the TEI’ will offer two concurrent workshop strands in text encoding for both beginners and intermediate practitioners. These two-day courses entitled ‘From Text Encoding to Digital Publishing’ and ‘TEI for Handwritten Texts’ will run on Wednesday, 7th and Thursday, 8th April. Both will focus on the theories and practicalities of creating electronic scholarly editions utilising the Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines, the standard in the field. They will be led by experts in the field of text encoding: Dr. Susan Schreibman, Mr. Kevin Hawkins, Dr. Malte Rehbein and Dr. Justin Tonra. Registration is required to participate in these workshops.

‘Using Digital Resources for Research and Teaching in Irish Studies’, which will take place on Friday, 9th April, will offer two half-day sessions . Participants may register for one or both of the workshops. The morning session, ‘Integrating Digital Content into Teaching Practices’ will focus on how one can integrate the wealth of primary and secondary resources now available into the field of Irish Studies in the classroom. The afternoon session, ‘New Research Practices using Digital Content’ will introduce participants to a number of freely available tools to transform and, indeed, deform data to discover new patterns, new themes, and new insights.

For more information and instructions on how to register for the above events, please follow the links below to their respective event pages. Please note that places are free but limited. They will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis numbers so early registration is advised.

Text Encoding with the TEI: http://dho.ie/node/679

Using Digital Resources for Research & Teaching in Irish Studies: http://dho.ie/node/680


Susan Schreibman, PhD
Director
Digital Humanities Observatory
Pembroke House
28-32 Upper Pembroke Street
Dublin 2, Ireland

– A Project of the Royal Irish Academy –

Phone: +353 1 234 2440
Fax: +353 1 234 2400
Mobile: +353 86 049 1966
Email: susan.schreibman@gmail.com
Email: s.schreibman@ria.ie

http://dho.ie
http://irith.org
http://macgreevy.org
http://v-machine.org

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

THATCamp and workshops at DH2010

Those planning to attend DH2010 might be interested in a series of extra events that are happening in the days immediately before the conference itself.

(a) First, there are seven full- and half-day workshops that are scheduled for immediately before DH2010.  All are also hosted at King’s in the same building where DH2010 will occur.  They are all free.  You can read about them at the conference website page:

http://dh2010.cch.kcl.ac.uk/academic-programme/pre-conference-workshops.html

and register to attend one or more of them via the DH2010 conference registration system.

(b) Second, there will be, for the first time, a THATCamp scheduled to occur with the Digital Humanities conference. THATCamps are user-generated “unconference” on digital humanities.  The THATCamp idea has been developed by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, and THATCamp London is jointly sponsored by CHNM, CCH and CeRch at King’s and ADHO. You can read more about the London THATCamp at:

http://www.thatcamplondon.org/

and you can apply to attend via the THATCamp registration form.  The deadline for the THATCamp application is 10 May, 2010.

These events promise to further enrich what is already going to be an exciting experience at DH2010.  I hope that many DH2010 attendees can join us for the workshops and the THATCamp too.

———————————————
John Bradley
Centre for Computing in the Humanities
King’s College London
Tel +44 (0)20 7848 2680

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

2010 DHO Summer School – Registration Now Open

www.dho.ie/ss2010

The DHO is pleased to announce that registration for the 2010 DHO Summer School, in conjunction with NINEs and the EpiDoc Collaborative, is now open.

The Summer School welcomes registrants from the various fields of the humanities, information studies, and computer science. Workshops and lectures cover subjects as diverse as text encoding, virtual worlds, and geospatial methods for the humanities. These are facilitated by leading experts, with plenty of time during evening activities for informal interaction.

This year, in addition to four-day workshop strands, the DHO is also offering mid-week, one-day workshops. For those unable to attend the entire Summer School, it is possible to register separately for these mid-week workshops and lectures.

As in previous years, the Summer School brings together Irish and International scholars undertaking digital projects in diverse areas to explore issues and trends of common interest. The programme will offer attendees opportunities to develop their skills, share insights, and discover new opportunities for collaboration and research. Activities focus on the theoretical, technical, administrative, and institutional issues relevant to the needs of digital humanities projects today.

The pricing for the full Summer School, as well as one-day workshops and lectures, is available on the registration page: http://dho.ie/ss2010/registration.

A number of subsidised places are available for attendees at HSIS institutions. For more information about these places, please contact the DHO Consultative Committee representative at your institution. Names of representatives can be found at: http://dho.ie/committee.

Full details of the workshop strands, lectures and guest speakers can be found on the Summer School website at: www.dho.ie/ss2010.

We look forward to seeing you in Dublin.


Emily Cullen, Ph.D.,
Programme Co-ordinator
Digital Humanities Observatory
28-32 Upper Pembroke Street
Dublin 2
Ireland

Tel: +353(0)1-2342442
Fax:+353(0)1-2342400
E-mail: e.cullen@ria.ie
http://dho.ie

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

TEI meeting 2010: Call for pre-conference workshop and tutorial proposals

TEI Applied: Digital Texts and Language Resources
2010 Annual Meeting of the TEI Consortium

http://ling.unizd.hr/~tei2010/

* Meeting dates: Thu 11 November to Sun 14 November, 2010
* Workshop dates: Mon 08 November to Wed 10 November, 2010
* Workshop proposals due Wed 31 March 2010

Traditionally, the TEI Conference and Members’ Meeting has been preceded by educational or research workshops. The goal of these workshops is to give members of the TEI community an opportunity to learn more about the use of the TEI markup under the guidance of experienced instructors and practitioners. In the past such workshops have ranged from a basic introduction to the use of TEI markup to more specialized sessions on specific aspects of the TEI or its use in specific domains. They have ranged in length from a single morning or afternoon to a maximum of two days. Workshops are run on a cost-recovery basis: a separate fee is charged of participants that is intended to cover the costs of running the workshop.

We are now soliciting proposals for workshops for the 2010 Conference and Members’ Meeting, to be held November 8-14 at University of Zadar, Croatia. Workshops are distinct from other conference activities, such as papers, sessions, and Special Interest Group meetings and we have tentatively reserved three days for them. These workshops should be educational in focus or involve hands-on work with a research problem. They should propose topics that are likely to be of interest to recognizable segments of the TEI community. Possible topics include:

  • An Introduction to TEI
  • TEI and libraries
  • Editorial practice and the TEI
  • Extending and customizing the TEI
  • Introduction to the ODD system
  • Using the TEI with other standards and markup languages
  • Images and the TEI
  • Use and development of tools and processes

Proposals addressing other topics are welcome and encouraged. If you are interested in proposing a workshop for the 2010 Members Meeting and Conference, please email meeting@tei-c.org by 31 March 2010. Expressions of interest should include as much as possible of the following information (the committee is willing to work with proposers in developing their proposals):

  • A proposed topic
  • A rationale explaining why this topic is likely to be of interest to the TEI community
  • A proposed instructor or slate of instructors including brief discussion of relevant experience
  • Method of instruction
  • Preferred length for the workshop
  • A preliminary budget of your anticipated costs (if any).

Organisational and infrastructure costs (e.g. coffee breaks and the like) will be determined later in conjunction with the local organising committee.

Proposals will be evaluated by the program committee primarily on the basis of their likely appeal to the TEI community, the quality of the proposed instructors and method of instruction, and cost. The committee will work with selected organizers after this date to refine the details of their workshops.

For the international programm comittee,

Christian Wittern (chair)


Christian Wittern
Institute for Research in Humanities, Kyoto University
47 Higashiogura-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8265, JAPAN

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

2010 DHO Summer School Registration Now Open

2010 DHO Summer School Registration Now Open

http://www.dho.ie/ss2010

The DHO is pleased to announce that registration for the 2010 DHO Summer School, in conjunction with NINEs and the EpiDoc Collaborative, is now open.

The Summer School welcomes registrants from the various fields of the humanities, information studies, and computer science. Workshops and lectures cover subjects as diverse as text encoding, virtual worlds, and geospatial methods for the humanities. These are facilitated by leading experts, with plenty of time during evening activities for informal interaction.

This year, in addition to four-day workshop strands, the DHO is also offering mid-week, one-day workshops. For those unable to attend the entire Summer School, it is possible to register separately for these mid-week workshops and lectures.

As in previous years, the Summer School brings together Irish and International scholars undertaking digital projects in diverse areas to explore issues and trends of common interest. The programme will offer attendees opportunities to develop their skills, share insights, and discover new opportunities for collaboration and research. Activities focus on the theoretical, technical, administrative, and institutional issues relevant to the needs of digital humanities projects today.

The pricing for the full Summer School, as well as one-day workshops and lectures, is available on the registration page: http://dho.ie/ss2010/registration

Full details of the workshop strands, lectures and guest speakers can be found on the Summer School website at: http://www.dho.ie/ss2010

We look forward to seeing you in Dublin.

Posted by: Dot Porter (dot.porter@gmail.com).

Digital Humanities Workshops: Metadata, Markup and Emerging Tools for Scholarly Analysis and Presentation

The DHO in conjunction with the University of Ulster is proud to present two one-day digital humanities workshop events: Seeing Data Differently and A Date With Data. Lead by Digital Humanities Specialists Shawn Day and Dr K Faith Lawrence these workshops will take place 17th and 18th February at the Magee Campus, University of Ulster.

The first workshop, ‘Seeing Data Differently: Emerging Tools for Scholarly Analysis and Presentation’, will combine a project clinic with hands-on demonstrations of web tools which can be used for managing, communicating and presenting data within and between digital humanities projects.

The second, ‘A Date With Data: What is this Markup Stuff Anyway?’, will provide beginners an introduction to metadata, markup and document encoding.

For more information and instructions on how to register for Seeing Data Differently and A Date With Data, please follow the links below to their respective event pages. Places are free but numbers are limited so early registration is recommended. Registration is done of a first come, first serve basis.

Seeing Data Differently: http://dho.ie/node/660
A Date With Data: http://dho.ie/node/674

Yours,

Faith

K. Faith Lawrence, PhD
Digital Humanities Specialist
Digital Humanities Observatory
28-32 Pembroke Street Upper
Dublin 2

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

Call for participation: TEI seminar on manuscript encoding

Applications are invited for participation in an advanced TEI seminar on manuscript encoding, being held at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, July 21-23, 2010, hosted by the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities.

Application deadline is March 1, 2010. Participants will be notified by March 12.

This seminar assumes a basic familiarity with TEI, and provide an opportunity to explore manuscript encoding topics in more detail, in a collaborative workshop setting. We will focus on the detailed challenges of encoding manuscript materials, including editorial, transcriptional, and interpretive issues and the methods of representing these in TEI markup.

This seminar is part of a series funded by the NEH and conducted by the Brown University Women Writers Project. They are intended to provide a more in-depth look at specific encoding problems and topics for people who are already involved in a text encoding project or are in the process of planning one. Each event will include a mix of presentations, discussion, case studies using participants’ projects, hands-on practice, and individual consultation. The seminars will be strongly project-based: participants will present their projects to the group, discuss specific challenges and encoding strategies, develop encoding specifications and documentation, and create encoded sample documents and templates. We encourage project teams and collaborative groups to apply, although individuals are also welcome. A basic knowledge of the TEI Guidelines and some prior experience with text encoding will be assumed.

Travel funding is available of up to $500 per participant.

For more information and to apply, please visit http://www.wwp.brown.edu/encoding/seminars/.

The rest of the seminar schedule is as follows:

University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Hosted by the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities
July 21-23, 2010
Application deadline: March 1, 2010
This workshop will focus on the encoding of manuscript materials.

University at Buffalo
Hosted by the Digital Humanities Initiative at Buffalo
October 2010 (precise date TBA)
Application deadline: May 17, 2010
This workshop will focus on the encoding of manuscript materials.

University of Maryland
January 2011 (precise date TBA)
Application deadline: September 6, 2010
This workshop will focus on the encoding of contextual information.

Brown University
Hosted by the Center for Digital Scholarship
April 28-30, 2011
Application deadline: December 1, 2010
This workshop will focus on the encoding of contextual information.

Julia Flanders
Director, Women Writers Project
Brown University

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

CFP: The Computational Turn (with website)

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY http://sites.google.com/site/dmberry/home/location
9TH MARCH 2010

http://www.thecomputationalturn.com/

Keynote: N. Katherine Hayles http://fds.duke.edu/db/aas/Literature/faculty/n.hayles (Professor of Literature at Duke University).
Keynote: Lev Manovich http://www.manovich.net/ (Professor, Visual Arts Department, UCSD).

The application of new computational techniques and visualisation technologies in the Arts & Humanities are resulting in new approaches and methodologies for the study of traditional and new corpuses of Arts and Humanities materials. This new ‘computational turn’ takes the methods and techniques from computer science to create new ways of distant and close readings of texts (e.g. Moretti). This one-day workshop aims to discuss the implications and applications of what Lev Manovich has called ‘Cultural Analytics’ and the question of finding patterns using algorthmic techniques. Some of the most startling approaches transform understandings of texts by use of network analysis (e.g. graph theory), database/XML encodings (which flatten structures), or merely provide new quantitative techniques for looking at various media forms, such as media and film, and (re)presenting them visually, aurally or haptically. Within this field there are important debates about the contrast between narrative against database techniques, pattern-matching versus hermeneutic reading, and the statistical paradigm (using a sample) versus the data mining paradigm. Additionally, new forms of collaboration within the Arts and Humanities are emerging which use team-based approaches as opposed to the traditional lone-scholar. This requires the ability to create and manage modular Arts and Humanities research teams through the organisational structures provided by technology and digital communications (e.g. Big Humanities), together with techniques for collaborating in an interdisciplinary way with other disciplines such as computer science (e.g. hard interdisciplinarity versus soft interdisciplinarity).

Papers are encouraged in the following areas:

- Distant versus Close Reading
– Database Structure versus Argument
– Data mining/Text mining/Patterns
– Pattern as a new epistemological object
– Hermeneutics and the Data Stream
– Geospatial techniques
– Big Humanities
– Digital Humanities versus Traditional Humanities
– Tool Building
– Free Culture/Open Source Arts and Humanities
– Collaboration, Assemblages and Alliances
– Language and Code (software studies)
– Information visualization in the Humanities
– Philosophical and theoretical reflections on the computational turn

Participation Requirements

Workshop participants are requested to submit a position paper (approx. 2000-5000 words) about the computational turn in Arts and Humanities, philosophical/theoretical reflections on the computational turn, research focus or research questions related to computational approaches, proposals for academic practice with algorithmic/visualisation techniques, proposals for new research methods with regard to Arts and Humanities or specific case studies (if applicable) and findings to date. Position papers will be published in a workshop PDF and website for discussion and some of the participants will be invited to present their paper at the workshop.

Deadline for Position papers: February 10, 2010
Submit papers to: http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=tct2010

Workshop funded by The Callaghan Centre for the Study of Conflict, Power, Empire http://www.swansea.ac.uk/humanities/ResearchCentres/CallaghanCentrefortheStudyofConflict/, Swansea University. TheResearch Institute in the Arts and Humanities http://www.swansea.ac.uk/artsandhumanities/riah/ (RIAH) at Swansea University.

Organised by Dr David M. Berry http://www.swan.ac.uk/staff/academic/Arts/berryd/, Department of Political and Cultural Studies, Swansea University. d.m.berry@swansea.ac.uk

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

DHO Summer School 2010

2010 DHO Summer School
in conjunction with NINES and the EpiDoc Collaborative
28 June – 2 July 2010
http://dho.ie/ss2010

The third annual Digital Humanities Observatory (DHO) Summer School will take place in Dublin from 28 June to 2 July 2010. Following the highly successful 2009 Summer School, next year’s event will see the expansion of popular workshop strands such as:

  • A Practical Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative
  • Data Visualisation for the Humanities
  • An Introduction to EpiDoc Markup and Editing Tools
  • The One to Many Text: Text Transformations with XSLT

The Summer School will feature lectures by Dr. Hugh Denard (King’s College London Visualisation Lab) and Dr Ian Gregory (University of Lancaster). Workshop facilitators include Dr Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Dr James Cowey (University of Heidelberg), Professor Laura Mandell (Miami University of Ohio), Dr Susan Schreibman (Digital Humanities Observatory), Justin Tonra (NUI, Galway) and Dana Wheeles (University of Virginia).

Major workshop strands will be conducted over four days allowing delegates to choose a mini-workshop on Wednesday from one of the following offerings:

  • Geospatial Methods for Humanities Research
  • Using Digital Resources for Irish Research and Teaching
  • Visualising Space, Time and Events: Using Virtual Worlds for Humanities Research
  • Finding the Concepts In the Chaos – Building Relationships With Data Models
  • Planning Digital Scholarly Resources: A Primer

The introduction of the one-day mini-workshops allows people to choose to attend a single-day event only at a reduced cost.

On Wednesday afternoon following the mini-workshops, Summer School staff, lecturers and facilitators will be available for private consultations.

Please note that the DHO Summer School takes place immediately before the annual Digital Humanities 2010 conference in London.  Visit our DHO Summer School website (www.dho.ie/ss2010 <http://www.dho.ie/ss2010&gt;) for updates and announcements. Registration will open on 15th of January.

Please direct any questions to Shawn Day (s.day@dho.ie) or Emily Cullen (e.cullen@dho.ie).

We look forward to seeing you in Dublin.

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

Pre-conference Workshops at DH2010: expressions of interest and proposals

As in previous years, the days 3-6 July, before the DH2010 conference (7-11 July at King’s College London ) have been set aside for community-run workshops. One can reach a diverse and committed body of participants in the Digital Humanities at DH2010. Do you or your project have a workshop up your sleeve that would interest this Digital Humanities community?

Half- or one-day slots are available for workshops, which need to be self-organized and self-funding. KCL can provide space for the workshop at no or low cost, so it is likely that the costs per participant would be low.

We would like to receive proposals for such workshops.

In your full proposal (total 500-800 words), please include:

(1) a brief description of the workshop programme, the project or community out of which it arises, the trainers who will run the workshop, and its proposed length;

(2) what is the demand for this workshop, and who do you expect the audience to be? What minimum number of attendees would be needed for you to do the workshop?

(3) what funding is available or will you seek to help to support the costs of this workshop (for instance, travel for trainers, lunch or refreshments for participants, as applicable)?

A few groups have already expressed interest in running workshops, and we have been talking informally with them. If you have ideas that is not yet fully formed, we would be delighted to e-speak to you about them before you submit a proposal.

The closing date for full proposals will be 31 December 2009. Please send them via email to both John Bradley (john.bradley@kcl.ac.uk) and Gabriel Bodard (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Posted by: Gabriel Bodard (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age: 17-22 May 2010

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the second year of this AHRC-funded course in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, the Warburg Institute, and King’s College London.

The course is open to arts and humanities doctoral students registered at UK institutions. It involves six days of intensive training on the analysis, description and editing of medieval manuscripts in the digital age to be held jointly in Cambridge and London. Participants will receive a solid theoretical foundation and hands-on experience in cataloguing and editing manuscripts for both print and digital formats.

The first half of the course involves morning classes and then visits to libraries in Cambridge and London in the afternoons. Participants will view original manuscripts and gain practical experience in applying the morning’s themes to concrete examples. In the second half we will address the cataloguing and description of manuscripts in a digital format with particular emphasis on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). These sessions will also combine theoretical principles and practical experience and include supervised work on computers.

The course is aimed principally at those writing dissertations which relate to medieval manuscripts, especially those on literature, art and history. There are no fees, but priority will be given to PhD students funded by the AHRC. Class sizes are limited to twenty and places are ‘first-come-first-served’ so early registration is strongly recommended.

For further details see http://ies.sas.ac.uk/study/mmsda/ or contact Dr Peter Stokes at mmsda@sas.ac.uk.


Dr Peter Stokes
Dept. of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic
The University of Cambridge
9 West Rd, Cambridge, CB3 9DP
Tel: +44 1223 767314
Fax: +44 1223 335092

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

WORKSHOP: Host your texts on Google in one day

The Center For Hellenic Studies will conduct a one-day workshop at the Center’s Washington, D.C., campus, on Monday, Jan. 11, 2010, with the subject: “Host your texts on Google in one day”. Bring one or more XML texts to the workshop in the morning, and leave in the afternoon with a running Google installation of Canonical Text Services serving your texts to the internet (http://chs75.chs.harvard.edu/projects/diginc/techpub/cts).

For more information, including how to apply, please see http://chs75.harvard.edu/CTSWorkshop.html.

Feel free to forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested.

Posted by: Roberto Rosselli Del Turco (rosselli at ling dot unipi dot it)

XML Summer School in Oxford, 20-25 Sept

For those who may have been away and missed the earlier announcement, the XML Summer School returns this year at St Edmund Hall, Oxford from 20th-25th September. As always, it provides high quality technical XML training for every level of expertise, from the Hands-on Introduction through to special classes devoted to XSLT, Semantic Technologies, Open Source Applications, Web 2.0 and Web Services. The Summer School is also an opportunity to experience what life is like as a student at one of the world’s oldest Universities.

Classes are taught by some of the most renowned XML experts, including Eve Maler, Michael Kay, Jeni Tennison, Michael Sperberg McQueen, Norm Walsh and Bob DuCharme.

Details are at http://www.xmlsummerschool.org/.

Editing the Medieval Laws of England: Workshop

Editing the Medieval Laws of England

Date: 24 October 2009
Location: Institute of Historical Research
Description: The Institute of Historical Research, London, will be hosting a free one-day workshop which will bring together established academics and postgraduate students with an interest in early English laws.

The workshop will facilitate discussion about editing the various legal codes, edicts, manuals and treatises composed in England before the issuing of Magna Carta in 1215. It aims to provide participants with an opportunity to share and discuss their ideas about methodology and issues such as digitisation and linguistics in a friendly, informal atmosphere. This event will offer project presentations and demonstrations as well as practical sessions on editing and presenting the laws in the digital age.

Booking: Attendance is free, but places are limited and offered on a first come basis. For more information and/or to register contact Dr Jenny Benham, Institute of Historical Research, University of London.

Posted by: Dan O’Donnell (daniel.odonnell@uleth.ca).